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5 days ago - /u/Cashmiir - Direct link

Originally posted by bz6

20% of League players play Valorant, but how about the other way around?

What is the stat regarding Valorant players playing League?

Sorry I think I may have miswrote it. It's 20% of Riot Games players iirc. But I can double check!

5 days ago - /u/Cashmiir - Direct link

Originally posted by nzm3883

What are the stas of LoR?

Unfortunately I don't have access to stats for the company, overall, nor do I think I'd be able to share them if I did. :(

5 days ago - /u/Cashmiir - Direct link

Originally posted by ProfPeanut

Reading about the process behind her story, I realize only now that Zeri sure is a lot like Taliyah - a teenage girl trying to learn to control her elemental gift so that she can help her home community and fight the region's powerful elite

Given that Rell wasn't too long ago and also ended up in a aimilar place, this almost feels like a new habit

Speaking as a woman gamer and not a Rioter, I really like seeing these stories. And to me it's no different than say, like, "big beefy fighter guy from X region/city fighting for power."

I don't know. Darius and Garen are pretty similar in my eyes, and yeah, there are some similarities between Taliyah, Rell, and Zeri. But the stories of young women overcoming aversity are a universal story for many women. Especially for women of color, which the three of them are.

The details of their stories are different and how they react, adapt, and overcome them are different, and speak to different audiences. I didn't grow up in a family or community like Zeri, but I appreciate her love for those around her, and that speaks to me. I didn't get thrown into a school for "gifted" kids and get abused and forced to kill my friends like Rell, but I understand her anger at her painful, past traumas. I didn't get gifted with a magical power to carve stone only to be paraded around Noxian society like an object to be ogled at like Taliyah, but I appreciate her need to protect the people she loves.

I think seeing these stories through different lenses and in different places and with different characters helps normalize the things that lots of young women (and men and non-binary folks) might feel. And that's the point for me, Erika, the woman, not the Riot Games employee, anyway.

5 days ago - /u/Cashmiir - Direct link

Originally posted by ProfPeanut

Appreciating the Tagalog worddrops all around. I'd suggest people read the Valorant article too, since it also gives some good info on the joined development

I had my Tagalog corrected by the Filipinos at Riot RIG. They were a huge, huge, huge help to me during writing this article (and I know to SkiptoMyLuo while working on Zeri and Neon as well).

5 days ago - /u/Cashmiir - Direct link

Originally posted by Thick_Literature_

I wonder why. Is it secret information? I don't see why it would harm Riot but maybe I'm just ignorant! Cheers Cashmiir.

I don't know, tbh. But I am nothing more than a goofy writer who is constantly fighting to say f*ck in my articles. Me big dumb with numbers and business.

5 days ago - /u/Cashmiir - Direct link

Originally posted by brooooooooooooke

I second this - sure, it's a bit of a trope, but it's a good one that resonates a lot with people, and there's a hundred and one tropes among League characters anyway. If you sum up champions in a simple sentence, you're going to get some overlap.

I mean, I read literally every single "chosen one" female lead YA fantasy novel that I can find.

Good writing isn't defined by being unique, it's defined by whether or not it resonates with its intended audience.

Originally posted by Cashmiir

Speaking as a woman gamer and not a Rioter, I really like seeing these stories. And to me it's no different than say, like, "big beefy fighter guy from X region/city fighting for power."

I don't know. Darius and Garen are pretty similar in my eyes, and yeah, there are some similarities between Taliyah, Rell, and Zeri. But the stories of young women overcoming aversity are a universal story for many women. Especially for women of color, which the three of them are.

The details of their stories are different and how they react, adapt, and overcome them are different, and speak to different audiences. I didn't grow up in a family or community like Zeri, but I appreciate her love for those around her, and that speaks to me. I didn't get thrown into a school for "gifted" kids and get abused and forced to kill my friends like Rell, but I understand her anger at her painful, past traumas. I didn't get gifted with a magical power to carve stone only to be paraded around Noxian society like an object to be ogled at like Taliyah, but I appreciate her need to protect the people she loves.

I think seeing these stories through different lenses and in different places and with different characters helps normalize the things that lots of young women (and men and non-binary folks) might feel. And that's the point for me, Erika, the woman, not the Riot Games employee, anyway.

Thank you.