15 days ago - /u/BobbyStein - Direct link

Originally posted by Turkeyspit1975

We are open to remote work in AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, ID, IL, MA, MD, NC, NV, NY OR, TX, UT and WA

That's kind of interesting? Like, why would they accept someone working remote from NC but not SC? MA but not NH or VT?

West Coast only would make sense, (time zones, easy to travel if required), but if they open it to East Coast states, why only those?

That's kind of interesting? Like, why would they accept someone working remote from NC but not SC? MA but not NH or VT?

West Coast only would make sense, (time zones, easy to travel if required), but if they open it to East Coast states, why only those?

Note: I am not an HR professional or a lawyer so if you want to know more you should consult a professional. But here's how I understand it. The TL;DR is that local/state labor laws vary from place to place, so a company has to navigate those issues to be compliant to be able to hire people who live there but work remotely for a company headquartered elsewhere. We previously could only hire in WA, CA, and TX but have expanded to more states.

15 days ago - /u/BobbyStein - Direct link

Originally posted by Spittinglama

That's a role with pretty good pay. Looks like you guys are trying to attract top talent for this project. Excited to hear about it!

That's a role with pretty good pay. Looks like you guys are trying to attract top talent for this project. Excited to hear about it!

That's the hope! Note that I'm not the hiring manager but would likely interface with this person a bit.

Also of note: the salary range of any job posting coming out of WA state typically represents the bottom and top of a band, and the final agreed upon rate is determined by a variety of factors including years of experience, cost of living, etc. that will fall within those two numbers. Just something to keep in mind when applying.